Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information Cerebrum: Definition, diagram, function, and more

You are searching about Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information, today we will share with you article about Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information is useful to you.

Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information

The cerebrum is the uppermost part of the brain. It contains two hemispheres split by a central fissure.The cerebrum itself contains the major lobes of the brain and is responsible for receiving and giving meaning to information from the sense organs, as well as controlling the body.The cerebrum does not make up the entire brain, however. The cerebellum and brainstem sit below the cerebrum and work alongside it to control the voluntary actions in the body.Keep reading to learn more about the cerebrum, including its various elements and how they work together. The interactive Bodymap below shows the brain, and the cerebrum within in. Click on it to learn more about the brain and its various parts.The cerebrum, or telencephalon, is the large upper part of the brain. It is divided into two hemispheres. In the human skull, the cerebrum sits atop the brainstem, with the cerebellum underneath the rear portion.The cerebrum itself has a few divisions, which neuroscientists generally use to classify the functions of the different areas. The sections below will describe these divisions in more detail.Cerebral cortexThe cerebral cortex is the outermost layer of the cerebrum, or its gray matter. In humans, this gray matter has an uneven surface with many folds. Ridges called gyri and valleys, or folds, called sulci help increase the surface area of the cerebral cortex.The cerebral cortex also houses the four major lobes:the frontal lobethe parietal lobethe occipital lobethe temporal lobeThese lobes each have two sections, divided by the central fissure in the brain. As there are no other distinct separations in the brain, neuroscientists divide the lobes roughly based on the major folds in the area. Major folds include the:Central sulcus: This divides the frontal and parietal lobes.Precentral gyrus: This is a ridge just in front of the central sulcus, which neuroscientists use to identify the primary motor cortex.Postcentral gyrus: This is a ridge just behind the central sulcus, which neuroscientists use to identify the primary somatosensory cortex.Lateral sulcus: This divides the temporal lobe from the frontal and parietal lobes.Superior temporal gyrus: This is a ridge below the lateral sulcus, where the brain first receives and processes information.A fifth lobe, called the insular lobe, is located within the lateral sulcus.White matterBeneath the cerebral cortex lie the deeper structures, often known as white matter. This includes connecting structures such as nerve fibers called axons, which help connect and transmit to various areas of the cerebral cortex.HemispheresA fissure divides the cerebrum into right and left hemispheres. Each hemisphere controls processes on the contralateral side of the body. This means, in general, that the right side of the brain receives and controls signals from the left side of the body, and that the left side of the brain receives and controls signals from the right side of the body.Also, although both hemispheres control many functions, some functions occur predominantly in one or the other.For example, in general, the left hemisphere controls functions such as speech, writing, and mathematics. The right hemisphere, in general, controls aspects of creativity, such as art and musical skills.Other structuresThe following are some other structures located within the cerebrum.ArteriesThe cerebrum also contains different sets of arteries to supply the brain with blood, separated into the anterior, middle, and posterior branches. Each branch helps supply blood to the different regions of the brain.Olfactory bulbThe olfactory bulb lies beneath the frontal lobe and delivers information directly to the cortex for interpretation.AmygdalaThe amygdala is a major component of the limbic system. It controls automatic reactions, such as the fight-or-flight response, in humans.HippocampusA structure within the temporal lobe, the hippocampus plays a role in learning and memory.The cerebrum itself houses the four major lobes, and each lobe as its own set of functions. So although the cerebrum as a whole controls numerous functions in the body, this is mainly due to the function of each individual lobe and the interplay between them.In general, the cerebrum controls all voluntary actions. It is also the control center for:sensory processingemotional controlmotor controlpersonality learningproblem solvinglanguage and speechvisual informationspatial informationcognition and higher thoughtimaginationcreativitymusic interpretationAreas in the cerebrum are responsible for receiving and interpreting much of the physical world around the body.The sections below will detail which lobe controls which processes.Frontal lobe speechbehavior and personalityemotionsbody movementintelligence and self-awarenessParietal lobelanguage and symbol usevisual perceptionsense of touch, pressure, and paingiving meaning to signals from other sensory informationTemporal lobememoryhearingunderstanding languageorganization and patternsOccipital lobe lightcolormovementspatial orientationInsular lobehomeostasiscompassion and empathyself-awarenesscognitive functionsocial experienceAlthough the cerebrum and cerebellum sound similar, they have different functions within the brain.The cerebellum sits below the cerebrum. It works directly with the structures in the cerebrum to coordinate functions such as posture and balance. It also sends signals to control muscle movements.Sustaining damage to the cerebellum may therefore result in balance or gait difficulties.Learn more about the cerebellum here.Because the cerebrum makes up much of the brain and controls all voluntary actions, sustaining damage to this area may cause widespread and varying consequences. Essentially, any condition affecting the brain may cause dysfunction in one or more areas of the cerebrum.The type and extent of the damage will vary based on its severity and where exactly in the brain it occurs. Damage from incidents such as an ischemic stroke may occur anywhere in the brain and can cause lasting dysfunction in the area.Other causes of damage to the cerebrum include accidents, injuries, or other chronic issues that cause atrophy or damage in the brain tissue.The cerebrum is a major part of the brain. It contains two hemispheres, and each has four major lobes. The cerebrum is responsible for voluntary actions as well as generating thought. Different lobes in the cerebrum will receive and control different bodily functions, though the lobes also work together to carry out many functions.Dysfunction may occur in one or more areas due to injury or a chronic health condition.The cerebrum is not the entire brain itself. Other structures, such as the cerebellum and brainstem, play roles in the various functions of the brain as a whole.

READ  What Is The Life Expectancy Of Someone With Hashimoto'S Thyroiditis Myxedema: Symptoms, treatment & coma

Video about Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information

2-Minute Neuroscience: Cerebral Cortex

The cerebral cortex is the outermost layer of the brain, and is involved in a long list of brain functions—including most of the higher functions often associated with human cognition. In this video, I discuss the appearance, cellular architecture, and functional subdivisions of the cerebral cortex.

For an article (on my website) that discusses the cerebral cortex, click this link: https://neuroscientificallychallenged.com/posts/know-your-brain-cerebral-cortex

TRANSCRIPT:

The cerebral cortex is the outermost layer of the brain. It is made up primarily of gray matter that is extensively folded, forming ridges called gyri and grooves called sulci. The folding substantially increases the surface area of the cerebral cortex, making room for more neural components.

Most of the cerebral cortex in humans is classified as neocortex, which is so named because it is thought to have appeared relatively recently in vertebrate evolution. Neurons in the neocortex are typically arranged in six layers, which are distinguished from one another by differences in cell type and cell density. The rest of the cerebral cortex is made up of either allocortex, which has a more variable pattern of layering, or mesocortex, which is a transition area between the neocortex and allocortex. Although attempts to functionally subdivide the cerebral cortex tend to oversimplify its functions, one common approach is to divide the cortex into sensory areas, motor areas, and association areas.

Sensory areas receive information related to sensation, and include regions like the primary somatosensory cortex—which processes information about sensations like touch, pain, and temperature—primary visual cortex, and primary auditory cortex, as well as other areas devoted to sensations like olfaction, taste, and the vestibular senses.

The motor areas of the cerebral cortex are involved with movement, and include regions like the primary motor cortex, premotor cortex, and supplementary motor cortex.

Association areas are involved in the integration of information from multiple brain regions. This integration can do things like add complexity to sensory perceptions or facilitate higher cognitive processes. For example, the association areas in the parietal cortex are thought to be involved with aspects of attention and perceptual awareness, and association areas in the frontal cortex are linked to complex processes like planning, impulse control, and self awareness.

REFERENCES:

Purves D, Augustine GJ, Fitzpatrick D, Hall WC, Lamantia AS, Mooney RD, Platt ML, White LE, eds. Neuroscience. 6th ed. New York. Sinauer Associates; 2018.

Vanderah TW, Gould DJ. Nolte’s The Human Brain. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA. Elsevier; 2016.

Zilles K, Amunts K. Architecture of the Cerebral Cortex. In: Mai JK and Paxinos G, eds. The Human Nervous System. 3rd ed. New York: Elsevier; 2012.

Question about Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information

If you have any questions about Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

[ad_1]

Rate Articles Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 3424
Views: 55378461

[ad_2]

Search keywords Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information

Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information
way Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information
tutorial Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information
Which Section Of The Cerebrum Is Involved With Sensory Information free

Related Posts

Explain The Difference Between Retrograde Amnesia And Anterograde Amnesia. Amnesia: Types, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment

You are searching about Explain The Difference Between Retrograde Amnesia And Anterograde Amnesia., today we will share with you article about Explain The Difference Between Retrograde Amnesia…

Which Of The Following Medications Has Strong Anti Inflammatory Properties Best natural anti-inflammatory herbs

You are searching about Which Of The Following Medications Has Strong Anti Inflammatory Properties, today we will share with you article about Which Of The Following Medications…

After Retirement Older Adults Problem Solving Activities Typically Involve Making a memory book for a person with dementia

You are searching about After Retirement Older Adults Problem Solving Activities Typically Involve, today we will share with you article about After Retirement Older Adults Problem Solving…

Sports Medicine Specialist Blue Cross Blue Shield Federal Employee Program Sorry this page not available

You are searching about Sports Medicine Specialist Blue Cross Blue Shield Federal Employee Program, today we will share with you article about Sports Medicine Specialist Blue Cross…

Physical Activity Level Is An Important Consideration When Calculating The Counting macros: What they are, benefits, how to count them

You are searching about Physical Activity Level Is An Important Consideration When Calculating The, today we will share with you article about Physical Activity Level Is An…

Amoxicillin And Clavulanate Potassium Tablets Usp 875Mg 125Mg Side Effects Augmentin (amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium): Side effects and more

You are searching about Amoxicillin And Clavulanate Potassium Tablets Usp 875Mg 125Mg Side Effects, today we will share with you article about Amoxicillin And Clavulanate Potassium Tablets…

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse e-mail ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *